Craig's Hut on The Clear Hill's trail - Mt. Stirling, Victoria 2005
Craig's Hut on The Clear Hill's trail - Mt. Stirling, Victoria 2005
Cradle Mountain from northern end of Dove Lake - Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park, Tasmania
Cradle Mountain from northern end of Dove Lake - Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park, Tasmania
The Twelve Apostles is a collection of limestone stacks off the shore of the Port Campbell National Park, by the Great Ocean Road in Victoria, Australia. Their proximity to one another has made the site a popular tourist attraction. Currently there are 8 apostles left but the name remains significant and spectacular especially in the Australian tourism industry.
The Twelve Apostles is a collection of limestone stacks off the shore of the Port Campbell National Park, by the Great Ocean Road in Victoria, Australia. Their proximity to one another has made the site a popular tourist attraction. Currently there are 8 apostles left but the name remains significant and spectacular especially in the Australian tourism industry.
London Arch (formerly London Bridge) is an offshore natural limestone arch formation in the Port Campbell National Park. The arch is a significant tourist attraction along the Great Ocean Road near Port Campbell in Victoria. This stack was formed by a gradual process of erosion, and until 1990 formed a complete double-span natural bridge. The span closer to the shoreline collapsed unexpectedly on 15 January 1990, leaving two tourists stranded on the outer span before being rescued by helicopter. Prior to the collapse, the arch was known as London Bridge because of its similarity to its namesake.
London Arch (formerly London Bridge) is an offshore natural limestone arch formation in the Port Campbell National Park. The arch is a significant tourist attraction along the Great Ocean Road near Port Campbell in Victoria. This stack was formed by a gradual process of erosion, and until 1990 formed a complete double-span natural bridge. The span closer to the shoreline collapsed unexpectedly on 15 January 1990, leaving two tourists stranded on the outer span before being rescued by helicopter. Prior to the collapse, the arch was known as London Bridge because of its similarity to its namesake.
The name Gibson Steps refers to the staircase leading down to a long stretch of beach. It is believed the steps were first carved into the cliff possibly by the original Kirrae Whurrong inhabitants and later maintained by a local settler, Hugh Gibson. The two offshore stacks are known locally as Gog and Magog. These limestone stacks are not considered part of the 12 Apostles.
The name Gibson Steps refers to the staircase leading down to a long stretch of beach. It is believed the steps were first carved into the cliff possibly by the original Kirrae Whurrong inhabitants and later maintained by a local settler, Hugh Gibson. The two offshore stacks are known locally as Gog and Magog. These limestone stacks are not considered part of the 12 Apostles.
The name Gibson Steps refers to the staircase leading down to a long stretch of beach. It is believed the steps were first carved into the cliff possibly by the original Kirrae Whurrong inhabitants and later maintained by a local settler, Hugh Gibson. The two offshore stacks are known locally as Gog and Magog. These limestone stacks are not considered part of the 12 Apostles.
The name Gibson Steps refers to the staircase leading down to a long stretch of beach. It is believed the steps were first carved into the cliff possibly by the original Kirrae Whurrong inhabitants and later maintained by a local settler, Hugh Gibson. The two offshore stacks are known locally as Gog and Magog. These limestone stacks are not considered part of the 12 Apostles.
Cradle Mountain from Dove Lake boat house after a summer snow fall.
Cradle Mountain from Dove Lake boat house after a summer snow fall.
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